Caribbean Fruits – Sapodillas, Oranges, Mangoes and Plums

These are the cups from an orange that just minutes before looked like the photograph below. There is nothing more satisfying that a ripe orange picked from your garden and consumed without a thought.

Usually, in Trinidad and Tobago fruit vendors sell the citrus fruit peeled from the bed of their vans. Oranges can be enjoyed with a pinch of salt. Although Portugals are a preferred choice because the outer peel can be easily removed by hand. The pegs are not as sweet. With oranges you need a knife to slice and divide the fruit into halves and then into quarters.

A confectionery is also made called shaddock, the grapefruit’s thick inner skin is boiled with sugar and made into a tart sweet.

But as citrus fruits go, oranges are not the king but rather limes are given that lofty title. Green limes are mainly used for seasoning fish or meat. At Christmas, cake and eggnog makers are at war if they have trouble finding a few. -thebookmann

These are the last photographs taken with the Minolta Dimage 7i the camera suddenly died after service of five years.

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Caribbean Fruits -Sapodilla

This is the tender flesh of the Sapodilla fruit. The colour is a deep purple. Once you have the fruit in your hand, you automatically bring it up to your nose. The smell is quite fragrant.

Sapodillas have a honey but slightly matted taste and texture. They are extremely sweet. One serving is quite enough, and the fruit is enjoyed chilled. The thin sandy brown textured skin is also edible but some people prefer to peel it off.

Sapodillas can be best described of having the constancy of guava jelly which in itself is a delicious confectionery of Trinidad and Tobago. The flesh melts in your mouth. -thebookmann

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Caribbean Fruits – Mango

I fall down flat on meh bottom and see stars….

This is a story that can relate to any West Indian child while attempting to pick mangoes and falling off the tree. The tropical fruit is loved by many Trinidadians and Tobagonians and it can be an obsession. The connoisseur will insure that when a mango is picked, it better not be bruised.

How many times have you heard someone say, I rather have a Julie over sex or I put a mango in his casket because he loved the fruit so dearly. True lovers of a Mango would suck the seed dry.

In Trinidad and Tobago, mangoes come in a variety. There is mango Starch, Rose, Vere, Calabash, Dooduce, long Mango and the much delicious Julie Mango. Mangoes are also curried as in a chutney, preserved or made into a pickled chow. So what ever is your treat, mangoes are a fruit which can be picked straight from your yard, if you live on the tropical paradise island called Trinidad and Tobago.

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Governor’s plum

This is the Governor’s plum which grows in the West Indies. The fruit is small with a large seed. The flesh is tart but sweet to the taste. Governor’s plums should be eaten when they is ripe but not overripe. Greener plums are enjoyed with a little salt and pepper. Just thinking about it makes your mouth water, but afterwards you’ll pay for it by a stomach ache.

The best time to collect Governor plums is before the birds do. They are in heaven having so many plums to choose from. Beneath a tree you may see the reminisce of their feast by the scores of bird pecked plums that litter the ground.


Governor’s plums in its short season – April and May

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